Albuquerque, NM

Background

 In June 2011, the Albuquerque Police Department launched its Smart Policing Initiative with the goal to make the department more efficient with the way it fights crime by using data and technology. Although Albuquerque is not a funded SPI Site, it is still practicing the Smart policing concepts. There are five areas the Albuquerque project is focused on accomplishing by 2013. The heart of Albuquerque's inititve is creating a real-time crime center that will provide live intelligence to field officers while they are responding to calls for service.


Project Plan

Albuquerque is currently developing the following

  1. An Intelligence Center

This center will be operational 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It will monitor dispatch traffic, video feeds from private and public sectors, provide real time intelligence to officers while they are being dispatched and daily crime analysis reports. The center will also analyze data from ankle bracelets, continuously update the department’s internal intelligence web site and monitors and take intelligence requests from the entire department. 

  1. A Mobile Intelligence Center

The mobile center will be able to do everything the center can. It will be deployed to homicides, child abductions, officer –involved shootings, large gatherings and any critical incident. The mobile center will be equipped with five work stations, large televisions, wireless internet, 360-degree cameras and a special work station for computer forensics to analyze any data. 

  1. An Intelligence Web Site and Monitors

The web site will provide real-time intelligence to the entire department. The web site will contain postings about crime patterns, suspects wanted for questioning, vehicles officers need to be on the look out for, repeat offenders recently released from custody and general bulletins. These same posts will also appear on video monitors that will be placed in all APD buildings and briefing rooms. The video monitor will also feature general department information such as overtime opportunities and a video feed of the monthly department announcements. 

     4.   Weekly Intelligence Meetings

These meetings will occur every week at the end of the chief’s staff meeting. Intel officers and Crime Analysts will present a report of crime trends noticed that week. At the meeting a discussion will occur about what tactical plans are needed to curb any trends.. 

  1. A Repeat Offender Initiative

This new initiative will start once funding is identified. Under this initiative, we will reach a partnership with the University of New Mexico’s Institute of Social Research to analyze the social trends of repeat offenders. Their data will tell us where repeat offenders come from, schools they belong to and their first crimes.  This data will help us focus our efforts in particular schools and neighborhoods so we can better implement our community policing strategy. Under this initiative, we will also establish a repeat offender threat level and create a top 100 repeat offender list. Using possible grant funding, we will seek a partnership with the District Attorney’s Office in which they will have one Assistant D.A. prosecute the top repeat offender cases. We will also start a program in which GPS ankle monitors are placed on repeat offenders when they are released from custody on bond.


Real-Time Crime Center News

 

March 1, 2013

Mayor Berry and Chief Schultz Open the Real-Time Crime Center

Officers will be provided real-time intelligence while they are responding to calls for service.

 Albuquerque— Mayor Richard J. Berry and Police Chief Raymond Schultz officially opened the Real Time Crime Center which will serve as an informational hub to the department providing critical information to officers before they take calls for service and while they are responding to emergencies.

With the opening, APD can now monitor more than 100 public and private sector cameras real time and send photos, videos and reports to officers while they are en route to a call.

Already the RTCC has paid off. On Feb. 1, the center went operational on a pilot basis and on the first day was asked by dispatchers to assist in a call in which someone called 911 reporting they saw someone post on Facebook that they were going to kill their children. The RTCC was able to trace an internet protocol address, locate a picture, home address and criminal history of the Facebook poster and send officers to his home.

A week later, the RTCC picked up a call in the Southeast Area command in which officers were looking for a shooting suspect. The RTCC heard the vehicle description, spotted the vehicle on a traffic camera located at Gibson and San Mateo and led officers to the suspect’s location.

The Albuquerque RTCC is unique compared to other centers across the country in that its operators monitor all calls for service and provide officers real-time intelligence before they arrive on the scene of an incident. Before the RTCC opened, officers received basic information from dispatch and many times all they knew was a location and a name. While the call is being dispatched, the RTCC checks names and addresses through dozens of APD, national and public databases to give the officer all of the information they need before they arrive on the scene of a high risk call.

“There have been so many incidents over the past several years in which we have all said to ourselves, ‘if only we knew that vital piece of information beforehand’,” Mayor Berry said. “The RTCC is changing the way the Albuquerque Police Department does business.”

In addition to providing real time intelligence, the RTCC will be the hub for the APD-TV system. Television monitors have been placed in all of APD’s briefing rooms. The monitors provide officers real time information on who has been released from jail, who is wanted, where crime has occurred in the past 24 hours and where APD’s crime analysts expect crime to occur. Eventually officers will also see a daily 5-minute newscast prior to briefing letting them know of certain crime trends and information they need to be on the look out for. On Wednesday, Valley officers saw an alert on the system during briefing about a suspect who was wanted on two felonies. The officers recognized him and picked him up 30 minutes after briefing.

“The goal of the RTCC is to provide officers all of the information they need before they go on their first call service and while they are going on the first call for service,” Chief Schultz said. “This center is unique compared to most in the country in the sense that we will be monitoring all calls as they come in and before they are even dispatched. Our primary mission in opening this center is to reduce the number of deadly force encounters our officers are involved in and to help keep them and the public safe by providing them all of the information they need.”

The RTCC is part of the newly-created Smart Policing Division. In June 2011, Chief Schultz launched the department’s Smart Police Initiative with the goal to make the department more efficient and safe for the public and the officers. Chief Schultz made opening an RTCC the top priority for Smart Policing.

A year ago, APD started developing the plans to create the center. A temporary RTCC was open in August in a small room in the main police station monitoring calls for service in the Southeast Area Command during day shift hours. Since that time, Sandia National Laboratories, which donated 160 research hours to the project, have been analyzing the effectiveness the center has on officer decision making. The analysis will continue for about 6 more months.

“Sandia’s preliminary data shows that police officers feel more aware of situations at the scene they are responding to when they receive information from the RTCC,” said De. Ann Speed, the researcher conducting the analysis. “These results are very preliminary; there is still a lot of data collection and research to be completed.”

The RTCC’s “Bridge” has eight work stations equipped with radios and computer aided dispatch, a supervisors’ area, 16 television monitors that are turned into video feeds, calls, intelligence alerts and a social media monitor, a television studio and a work space for four crime analysts. In January, APD’s Crime Analysis Unit was assigned to the Smart Policing Division and since then analysts have been developing a real time mapping platform that tells officers in real time the locations of ankle bracelets and addresses tied to crisis intervention alerts.  The renovations made cost about $800,000, part of which was paid for out of bond money designated for APD facility improvements and federal grants.

The RTCC is currently open 8 hours a day, seven days a week and is available for any officer to call and request assistance. By May 15, Chief Schultz has directed the division to have the center open 18 hours a day.

Half of the RTCC staff is manned by officers who have been injured or pregnant and are recovering or awaiting to give birth before they can go back to the streets. Not one officer was taken from the Field Services Bureau to man the center.

Under the next phase of the project, the RTCC will be working on equipping the center with facial recognition software that can match images to known criminals, developing an offender alert system, and it is piloting technology that will put special smart phones on officers that will provide real-time lapel camera feeds and officers’ locations to the center.

Many agencies were involved in the project including:

  • Sandia Laboratories which has been analyzing data from officers receiving real-time intelligence and developing research to determine its effectiveness.
  • The Albuquerque Department of Municipal Development worked to establish a connection from all of its traffic cameras to the RTCC.
  • The New Mexico Department of Public Safety has been providing a link to the AFIS system which will allow officers to access fingerprints from the field as well as utilize the Interstate Photo System Facial Recognition Pilot which as part of the FBI- CJIS - Next Generation Identification Project.
  • Blakes Lotaburger which is the first business that signed a memorandum of understanding with APD agreeing to allow officers access to their cameras in the event of a call for service.
  • IDSoftware will be testing its software on special smart phone devices and the RTCC. It will create a link to AFIS allowing officers to run fingerprints from the field.
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation, Criminal Justice Information Services Division, Next Generation Identification Program providing software to link to the Interstate Photo System Facial Recognition Pilot. 

“All of our partners have told us that what we are doing has never been tried before,” Chief Schultz said. “That’s why they want to test their technology here in Albuquerque because what we learn from our center will undoubtedly change law enforcement across the country.” 

 

 

Sept. 12, 2012

APD Announces it Will open a Real-Time Crime Center

Officers Will receive real-time intelligence and be prepared for any call for service

Albuquerque— Mayor Richard J. Berry and Police Chief Raymond Schultz officially started the renovation of part of the old main police station Wednesday to turn it into a Real Time Crime Center (RTCC).

The Albuquerque RTCC will be unique compared to other centers across the country in that analysts will be monitoring all calls for service and providing officers real-time intelligence before they arrive on the scene of an incident. Currently, officers receive basic information from dispatch and many times all they know is a location and a name. While the call is being dispatched, the RTCC will be checking names and addresses through dozens of APD and national databases to give the officer all of the information they need before they arrive on the scene of a high risk call.

“We are going to change the way the Albuquerque Police Department does business," Mayor Berry said. "The RTCC is not only give us vital information to assist in incidents to come, but we will be able to intervene completely in so many others."

In addition to providing real time intelligence, the RTCC will be hub for the APD-TV system. The television monitors that have been placed in all of APD's briefing rooms already do provide real-time information on who has been released from jail, who is wanted, where crime has occurred in the past 24 hours and where APD’s crime analysts can expect crime to occur. These monitors will also eventually host a daily  5-minute newscast prior to briefing letting them know of certain crime trends and information they need to be on the look out for.

“The goal of the RTCC is to provide officers even more if not all of the information they will need before they go on their first call for service and to maintain that flow of information all through their shift,” Chief Schultz said. “One of our primary missions in opening this center is to reduce the number of deadly force encounters our officers are involved in and to help keep them and the Albuquerque public safe by providing them all of the information they need.”

The RTCC is part of the newly-created Smart Policing Division. In June 2011, Chief Schultz launched the department’s Smart Police Initiative with the goal to make the department more efficient and safe for the public and the officers. Chief Schultz made opening an RTCC the top priority for Smart Policing.

In June, APD started developing the plans to create the center. A temporary RTCC was open earlier last month in a small room in the main police station. Since then a detective has been monitoring calls for service in the Southeast Area Command during day shift hours and has been providing real-time intelligence to its officers.

A week ago the RTCC was instrumental in leading officers to the correct location of a possible hostage situation in the Northeast Heights. Although the RTCC was dedicated to the Southeast, officers quickly requested its assistance.

When fully functional, the RTCC will have eight work stations equipped with radios and computer aided dispatch, a supervisors area, 16 television monitors that will be turned into video feeds and calls, a television studio and work space for intelligence officers and analysts. The renovations are expected to cost $265,000, which is being paid for out of bond money designated for APD facility improvements.

When the RTCC opens in January, it will be under a pilot project for the first three months and will only monitor certain areas during certain shifts. The goal is to eventually expand the RTCC to include the entire city during all hours.  Several private and public partnerships have been formed to open the RTCC and conduct the pilot. They include:

  • Sandia Laboratories which has been analyzing data from officers receiving real-time intelligence and developing research to determine its effectiveness.
  • The New Mexico Department of Public Safety has been providing a link to the AFIS system which will allow officers to access fingerprints from the field as well as utilize the national facial recognition repository.
  • Albuquerque-based ICSS Security Systems is working on a video network of its customers that will be provided to APD in the event there is a call near one of their cameras. RTCC analysts will have the ability to pull up camera feeds from locations prior to an officer arriving.
  • Motorola will be providing and testing new devices to the officers that will create a link to the RTCC.
  • IDSoftware will be testing its software on the Motorola devices and the RTCC. IT will create a link to AFIS allowing officers to run fingerprints from the field.
  • Criminal Justice Information Services is providing software to be able to link into the national facial recognition repository.

 

July 16, 2012

APD Unveils New High-Tech Device That Will Record SWAT Standoffs

Mobile Video Surveillance Trailer will be dispatched to critical incidents

Albuquerque— Police Chief Raymond D. Schultz unveiled the Police Department’s new mobile video surveillance unit Monday that will be dispatched to certain SWAT calls, utilized to monitor the city’s downtown bar district and help the APD’s Property Crimes Division catch thieves in the act.

The unit is a part of Chief Schultz’s Smart Policing Initiative, which he launched a year ago in an attempt to utilize new technology, predictive crime analysis and data to help give officers more information to make informed decisions.

“This state-of-the-art technology will not only help us catch thieves in the act, but will also help us make informed decisions during critical incidents and document everything that occurs,” Chief Schultz said. “As technology improves, so do our response, our tactics and our service to the community.”

The department has been testing the unit for the past month deploying it at the City’s Centennial Festival and the Fourth of July Fireworks display at Balloon Fiesta Park. Chief Schultz decided to start sending the unit to SWAT calls after the department’s SWAT team had been deployed in a 15-hour standoff in which a suspect had barricaded himself inside his South Valley home.

During the investigation into the SWAT call, detectives discovered that some of the SWAT team member’s personal video recorders had shut off after 30 minutes. Some of the recorders also showed nothing but darkness and in some cases SWAT team members were having difficulty turning the cameras on and off while they were trying to prepare for a possible entry into the home. On Monday, the Chief released 23 videos from the call taken from six different officers, as well as 911 calls, radio traffic, dispatch logs, and photographs.

Due to the time it takes to set up the trailer, it will only be dispatched to SWAT calls that are expected to last for a long period of time. In addition to the trailer, the SWAT team is in the process of testing cameras that attach to their helmets that will also record their contacts with the public. In 2010, Chief Schultz launched the department’s lapel camera initiative directing Field Services officers to video record certain types of calls. Since then, the Chief has expanded the program to include most officers and detectives to record all calls they are dispatched to.

The trailer is equipped with four cameras that are attached to a 30-foot boom that can be raised and lowered. Each camera can be controlled remotely through a 3G wireless cellular connection from anywhere in the City. The trailer is equipped with a digital video recorder that can record for days, solar panels, a diesel engine that will allow it to be deployed for as long as a month without any maintenance, and infrared technology that will record at night. The trailer cost approximately $68,000 and was paid for out of the department’s general fund.


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